The reviews for The Last Sunset are rolling in….

“A rollicking ride, passionate, powerfully compelling.”

“The stakes are higher than ever in the latest chapter of this outstandingly entertaining series.”The_Last-Sunset-Hays-and-McFall-Cover

“A finale that will leave you covered in blood and begging for more.”

“A terrific, original piece of vampire lore. It’s never a dull moment in Lone Pine, sometimes it’s scary, and sometimes it’s downright heart-wrenching. This final volume is no exception.”

“This is a fantastic and slightly off-beat series and I’m sad this is the last one and we’re saying goodbye to these guys.”

“Longmire meets Preacher!”

“These two authors nail every detail about ranch life, horses, and probably Vampires, perfectly.”

From the back cover:

Take one long, last look at LonePine, Wyoming, population 438. It’s been two years since the vampires quit the quirky little town and things are mostly back to normal — broken dreams and never enough whiskey. But that’s about to go to hell.

Hold on tight for a midnight showdown when a psychotic religious order takes the entire town hostage — including Tucker’s long-lost brother — to lure Lizzie from her frozen exile in Russia. The mad monks know Lizzie’s murder will strand the ruling vampire elite in a disembodied afterlife so the cult can impose their twisted beliefs on the living and undead alike. It’s a rip-roarin’ stampede as a cowboy and a vampire try to round up the shattered pieces of their unusual romance.

With the fate of the world on the line yet again, can Tucker and Lizzie put aside their broken hearts to face one last sunset together?

Slap leather or reach for the sky.

Click here to buy The Last Sunset
#lastsunset #tls


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1. You write in a relatively unknown genre you call Western Gothic. What is it? Western Gothic is a style of fiction that transplants the moody, death-obsessed themes of classic gothic fiction (think Castle of Otranto or, of course, Dracula) to the wide open, inspiring vistas of the modern west (Riders of the Purple Sage or All the Pretty Horses).

Western Gothic exists in the negative space between dark and light. Gothic fiction uses the darkness–the creepy atmosphere, curious, obsessive behavior and morbid thoughts–to focus on the light, providing the perfect backdrop to illuminate the best in people: the desire to overcome death, to hope and to love.Westerns, ironically, use the light to set off the dark, weaving stories of good men pushed to the limits by the cruelty and avarice of others (usually tyrannical land owners) or the blind apathy of nature. Western Gothic lives in the borderlands between the two worlds, a forever twilight of gray nights and last sunsets. To put it in contemporary terms, it’s Longmire meets Preacher.

We suspect we may have unintentionally invented the genre with The Cowboy and the Vampire Collection, a series of four books set in the modern rural west and featuring sexy, brooding vampires bent on world domination. Since the first book’s publication in 1999, we’re happy to see a few others trying out the genre.

2. Why Western Gothic and when did you first start writing in the genre? 
We love writing in the Western Gothic genre because we get to explore huge,archetypal themes about human consciousness, love and death, AND we get to move our characters across stunning natural landscapes with deconstructed shootouts and heart-pounding action. Add in the quirky humor natural to small towns and along-suffering cowdog with the soul of a poet–and some pretty steamy undead erotica–and we hope it makes for an unforgettable reading experience.  Read the rest of this entry »

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All good things must, eventually, come to an end — including vampires. Clark Hays and Kathleen McFall have penned the fourth and last book in The Cowboy and the Vampire series. “The Last Sunset” brings a close to the tale of Lizzie, Tucker and the rest of the gang with a finale that will leave you covered in blood and begging for more. It’s sexy, it’s funny, it’s scary, and it will get your heart jumping like a pickup truck on an old county road. Read the full review.

kirkus_500x95“Bullet-riddled and blood-soaked, this installment smartly weaves a narrative between the threads left loose at the end of the last book, while sprinting through its action-propelled plot. The writing team of Hays and McFall keeps getting better and better. As the tension builds, the estranged lovers will have to work together to protect the ones they love and find a way to prevent the Guild from sacrificing the world in the name of its ancient god. But Tucker is a proud man, and Lizzie still believes her decision to desert him was for the best. At times graphically violent, provocatively sensual, and even existential, this novel maintains the series’ reputation as a thrilling page-turner that will satiate its readers’ desire for compelling action conveyed through a saga of undying love. The stakes are higher than ever in the latest chapter of this outstandingly entertaining vampire series.”

Read the full review from Kirkus
Buy The Last Sunset
#lastsunset #tls

We love reader reviews and here are a few excerpts from recently posted on Amazon for Just West of Hell.

SUPERNATURAL mysteries are not new. As this story happens in the 1800s and is visited by old DEMONS, the undead and REGULAR ZOMBIES we must note they have existed for…well , as long as mankind, maybe longer. This entertaining tale of the old west tells how they dealt with the evil in their days. Probably better than in our times…

There is a rich history of Old West lawmen who kept the peace in one horse, one bar towns spread across the empty west. Wyatt Earp in Tombstone, Bat Masterson in Kansas come to mind, along with plenty of other less known names, mostly largely forgotten but essential to the peaceful settlement of those deeply remote places, which attracted far more than their fair share of desperadoes – all carrying sidearms. Early Hardiman, sheriff of LonePine, Wyoming during the 1890s was cut from the same lawman cloth but, in addition to the run-of-the-mill bad guys he had dispatched serially one by one, Early had to contend with the undead world of vampires, drawn to LonePine in a series of earlier convulsions. This short, imaginative novel, reads fast and satisfies fully.

I’m a big fan of The Cowboy and the Vampire series. This was an exciting, entertaining, crusty, twisted, and rip-snortin’ peek at the history of LonePine. I loved it.

Clark Hays’ latest is now available. From Clark: “A little thank you to our readers to tide you over as you wait patiently for Book 4!” And here’s a #giveaway over on Amazon for Just West of Hell; for a little while, it’s Just West of FREE!

Wet your whistle with a whiskey-flavored time-travel adventure back to LonePine when it was just a bend in a muddy, horse-trodden road in Wyoming Territory, where fading gunslinger-turned-good-guy sheriff Early Hardiman faces off against the occult in the defense of passion.What is it about LonePine that attracts the good, the bad and the undead? Could it be something in the geology?

From Pumpjack Press to you: Happy Spring! We hope you enjoy this appetizer to The Last Sunset, coming in June 2016.

Click on the image to buy!

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Image  —  Posted: March 15, 2016 in News and items of interest

What are we reading? Check out two new book reviews from Clark Hays.

The Soul of the Marionette by John Gray: Cutting the strings of human exceptionalism

John Gray covers familiar ground, eloquently. He plunders obscure writers and leans heavily on his knowledge of history to build an argument that deconstructs human exceptionalism and to dispel the notion that people, society and culture progress in some linear fashion. His thesis is that humans create the illusion of order because the alternative — embracing the certainty that we are mortal and meaningless creatures (“flawed, intermittently lucid animals”) in an indifferent world — fills many of us with paralyzing dread. That created sense of order was once overseen by invented gods, then an invented god and now by science (which, in a sense, elevates human ingenuity to the status of an invented god). Regardless of how it is embodied, the underlying impulse is to create a sense of purpose and progress that he, of course, considers false. Read the full review>>

Porius by John Cowper Powys: Endure to the End

Tungerong larry ong — endure to the end — is both a rallying cry of the main character of this incredible, and incredibly complex, book, and a much-needed encouragement to readers. At 762 pages, each filled with epic, breathless sentences crackling with mystical subtext, unpronounceable Welsh names and a gargantuan cast of characters, this is not a book one should enter into lightly.

It took me almost three months to finish, but the journey was worth it. Porius is gripping and challenging and dense and impenetrable and layered with swirling currents of meaning. It is an insane mix of history and magic, action and romance, and philosophy and religion. There are giants and magicians (including Merlin), scheming druids and savage forest people with poisoned arrows, the foppish court of King Arthur and grim-faced Saxon invaders, owls that become women, nature worship, magic rivers, enchanted mists, old curses, ancient myths and even more ancient burial grounds and all manner of petty, squabbling gods and their slavish worshippers — from Saturn to Mithras to Yahweh. Read the full review>>

Kirkus

Riveting, wickedly funny, existential, brilliantly written, authentically western …

Introducing racial issues isn’t the only adjustment the authors have made to the vampire mythos, but it’s more than just the details that set this series apart. Rather, it’s the way the authors utilize those details to create meaningful conflicts and world-altering choices for the characters. Riveting. – Kirkus Reviews

One of the funniest and most engaging series I have read in a long time. – Bitten by Books

Pour yourself a shot of the good stuff and settle in for a wickedly good read. – The Eastern Oregonian 

Unremitting fun, and a damn good read. – Fresh Fiction

Go ahead. You’re trying not to laugh at the title. Let it out! It’s funny and so is the book; sly and adult. – SF Site Featured Review

One of the weirdest stories I have ever read. It’s right up there with Neil Gaiman’s man-swallowing woman parts and talking tents. Instead, here we have rocket-launching, womb-sucking, Bible-bending, non-pointy-toothed vampires. And love. And cowboys. Depending on what you are looking for, that might be a good thing. If I had to liken this book to a movie, it would either be to Tucker & Dale vs. Evil, or maybe more appropriately, Quentin Tarantino’s From Dusk to Dawn. – The Avid Reader

A choice and very much recommended read, not to be missed. – Midwest Book Reviewdeeo.ru

The literary trend is just getting started, but by the looks of it, fiction readers and NDE followers are in for a fascinating ride. Here are five novels in which the NDE is central to the plot of the book and the actions of the characters.

A spate of new novels that include the NDE as a central plot element are popping up across genres — thrillers, horror, sci-fi, westerns and even literary fiction. Publishing houses range from the New York Big Six to small press and independently published e-books. Contemporary fiction is not only a testing ground to explore cutting-edge theories about NDEs, it’s also a unique frontline glimpse into society’s shifting perspectives. Indeed, this nascent but growing literary trend resembles what would become the sci-fi heyday of the mid to late twentieth century. Read the rest of this entry »